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City of Pleasanton Salutes LMA

LMA Productions was recognized by Pleasanton's City Council on its 20th Anniversary of business in the community.  LMA was acknowledged for its outstanding contributions in the field of corporate & marketing media productions.

 

Company History PDF 
History

Spring 2007 ...

New Company - New Leadership
LMA Film and Video.Inc. reorganized to become LMA Productions, LLC.

Thaddeus Coberg, Doug Mann, and Glenn Shockley have joined original founder David Liskin as partners in the new venture. The new attitude afforded by this change in management is taking the company in exciting new directions. It also inspired a previous Director of New Media to return in January 2007. Watch for exciting new strategic alliances in the Summer of 2009!

IN THE BEGINNING...

It all started in Florida, when fitness veteran Arthur Jones (founder of Nautilus corporation) hired a young and energetic David Liskin to oversee the creation of a massive new television complex. This gigantic, 5-stage facility was truly of historic proportions. It was home to the largest number of video tape recorders in a single facility, in the world. Cameras, switchers, audio equipment, all of it was first class. There were well over 100 employees, and such an installation could accommodate any conceivable television project.

Nautilus Studios indeed boasted a formidable heyday of achievement, but its success did not last forever. The influx of television business that was expected in Florida did not materialize at a rapid enough rate to support such a grand operation. Ultimately, its high overhead was too much to support on the basis of Florida’s TV industry of the day, and Nautilus had to close its doors. “I never wanted to own equipment again”, remembers Liskin, vowing instead to use his production skills in the future to create television without the need to support his own facility.

From 1983 - 1986, he lead a small team of dedicated professionals as they participated in creating the then-new industry of consumer video programming for end users. People were starting to get VCRs, as they were the first “video on demand” medium in existence. The industry was still relatively new, and the potential for consumers and professionals to receive training, information and entertainment seemed endless. The exacting skills he honed at Nautilus were just what his clients needed to take full advantage of this new art, in contrast to the sea of “cheap video” startups who had not yet mastered it.

1986 saw the relocation of the company to the San Francisco Bay area. For years we had been favoring west coast production facilities for our projects, and the move out of Florida seemed natural. We prospered through the 80’s and into the turn of the decade.

By 1990, our business model had a very clear direction. We were becoming a “darling” producer for the high tech industry, particularly the many medical device companies, sports medicine and those in the pharmaceutical industry. There were many reasons they relied so heavily on us.

These companies were trailblazers. Often, their product (or even their company) was little more than an idea. Our ability to harness the new world of 3D computer animation to explain how these companies’ devices and concepts would actually work, was the stuff of magic. We had the innate ability explain very complex processes in the most comprehensive manner possible. Our video productions gave industry a new way to sell a product, raise capital, or even take their company to Wallstreet. At the same time, they knew their secrets were safe with LMA.

The proprietary nature of so many of our projects made us begin to think about the wisdom of continuing to operate in the less secure atmosphere of outside production facilities. We were always cautious about the security of intellectual property and had built our reputation on strict confidentiality. We had to admit to ourselves that it would therefore be best to build our own studio, reducing the likelihood of project interruptions and creating the safest possible environment.

This new initiative came to fruition in 1991, when parallel efforts were coincidentally underway by another television professional. The legendary football coach and sports announcer John Madden was considering building a video stage to serve as a location for fulfilling his ever growing duties as a broadcaster and corporate sponsor. His “team” for this new entity was not yet complete. He already had Doug Mann, his engineer from Livermore CA for his “Ace Sports Quiz” and ”John Madden’s Sports Calendar” syndicated radio shows. Both of them were seeking an existing video company to make the new studio complete, in order to avoid putting together the whole video department from scratch. Fate was satisfied when Madden found David Liskin, searching for roughly the same thing. On November 1 1991, the Liskin Madden Associates stage (the LMA acronym derived from a previous partner) was finally open for business in Pleasanton.

The following months were a period heavy of activity. The 3,000 square foot shooting stage was the largest in the east bay. It was outfitted with 75 feet of cyclorama, a 16.5 foot lighting grid, and a massive 1,200 amps of power. A state of the art television control room was installed to accommodate the full breadth of needs from live TV, to advanced component video editing, audio sweetening, graphics, and anything else that a full service production facility would be required to provide. Plenty of whisper quiet air conditioning was added to complement the famous coach’s affinity for cold weather. LMA with Goalline, (the production company for the "All Madden Team") began a new era of technology and sports television production on a solid footing.

LMA and Goal Line both resided here as independent but cooperative production entities. LMA and David Liskin brought our years of experience in sports medicine, music, medical and pharmaceutical video production capabilities, along with a cherry-picked team of tradesmen. Joe Madden (John’s son) managed Goal Line, and leveraged the “All Madden Team” and the stage’s new capabilities to expand into new territories.

Some people ask us whatever happened to Jumbo Studios. The stage itself was emblazoned with a fancy sign in front that said “Jumbo Studios”, in part to convey the size of the facility but also as a testament to the size of our optimistic goals. It also happened to be the name of Joe’s dog at the time, a rather large bull mastiff. There was really never an operational Jumbo company, and today we simply call the stage what it is - LMA Productions.

Today, LMA continues as one of the Bay Area's top tier stages, and the largest video studio in Silicon Valley, San Jose and the East Bay with an integrated control room. Some things have changed, but the most important thing stays the same. We thank our customers for every opportunity we have had to engage in quality work, well intended, and well executed.

 

LMA WINS A FREDDIE AWARD

In 2008 our production "Time is Brain" was selected as the winner of the prestigious Freddie Award.

 


 

AT&T U-verse spent a big chunk of October on the LMA television stage shooting testimonials for its upcoming nationwide television campaign.  The San Francisco Bay Area joined Miami, Chicago and New York markets shooting the remarks of local subscribers lauding the TV, Phone & Internet features offered by their service.  Our own LMA Partner & Producer, Thaddeus Coberg and his son, Ben were invited to offer on-camera testimonials.  Thad says it was the genesis of his strategic transition to his new acting career.